The Law Office of Matthew M. Williams, P.C.

630-409-8184

1444 North Farnsworth Avenue, Suite 307, Aurora, IL 60505

Yorkville Office By Appointment

Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in divorce statistics

Illinois custody attorney, Illinois family law attorney, Illinois divorce lawyer,Recently it was reported that the participants of a reality show entitled, “Married at First Sight,” had finalized their divorce, citing irreconcilable differences at the time of filing. A second couple from the show started the divorce process last month. This begs the question whether or not a brief period of engagement dooms the marriage.

The Engagement Period

Various studies on the subject offer no concrete answers as to the perfect length of engagement, certain themes emerge that show tendencies on the subject.

...

Posted on in Divorce and Holidays

Illinois custody attorney, Illinois family law attorney, Illinois divorce lawyer,It seems, by many accounts, that once the presents are all opened, the decorations stored away for another year and the final notes of Auld Lang Syne have faded, that thoughts frequently turn toward divorce. As is the case with most things in life, divorce is another that seems to have its own season during which the rate is higher than other times of the year.

It All Starts in January

As it turns out, January is a popular month for online searches that include the terms “divorce lawyer” and “file for divorce.” Some studies show it only second, by less than half a percent, to July. So why is January a month when many people begin the divorce process? The answers appear fairly straight-forward.

...

Illinios divorce attorney, Illinois family law attorney, marriage statistics,It is no secret that nearly half of American marriages end in divorce, at least according to oft-cited statistics. The Center for Disease Control reports that the average marriage rate in the U.S. is 6.8 per 1,000 total people, and the divorce rate was 3.6 in the same number of people. Illinois actually had one of the lowest divorce rates in the country in 2011, at only 2.6 per 1,000 people. Nevada, Oklahoma, and West Virginia had the highest divorce rates in the county, with over 5.2 per 1,000 people. Yet according to many sources, the divorce rate in the U.S. may actually be on the decline in 2015. The reasons as to why may be surprising.

The first is a sign of our times: less people are getting married to begin with. According to research from the Pew Center, only 51 percent of Americans were married in 2011. This is a significant decrease from the 72 percent who were married in 1960. Some researchers suggest the reason for this is because marriage does not seem like the only option in today’s modern world: with more women working outside the home and less relying on a husband to take care of them, marriage rates will fall. The average age of marriage is also increasing — it has long been true that the risk of divorce decreases as the age of marriage increases. Another factor is socioeconomic. The more educated that spouses are, the less likely they are to divorce.

Yet these statistics do not necessarily give the whole picture. Just because a couple is not married does not mean that their long-term relationship is any less painful or financially complicated to end. In fact, often if the couple is not married, it can be even more difficult than divorce because there are not the same legal protections allowed married couples.

...

marriage statistics, Illinois divorce attorney, Aurora family law attorney,If someone claims that the national divorce rate is roughly 50 percent — if not more — most people would be inclined to believe that number is accurate. The notion that one in two marriages fails is a popular belief, yet it is a misconception.

With contagious article headlines and absurd stories of celebrity marriages almost ending before they began, most Americans assume that divorce is almost guaranteed. The truth, however, is far more nuanced, according to PsychCentral.

The real data shows not only a lower divorce rate than most assume, but it also reveals how economic and social factors play major roles in the ultimate outcome. Moreover, it appears that the common myth of a 50 percent to 60 percent divorce rate is making people more pessimistic about marriage.

...

divorce risk, Illinois divorce lawyer, DuPage County family law attorney, Conventional wisdom dictates that there is a strict correlation between educational attainment and divorce. According to a 2013 report released in the Monthly Labor Review, a publication of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), both men and women with a college education tend to marry later than their non-college-educated counterparts. Marrying later in life could be one reason that people with college degrees are also less likely to divorce than those without any higher education. The average age among those who had not completed high school to be married was 22.8, while the average age among those with a college degree was 24.9. The BLS found that approximately 50 percent of marriages end in divorce among those who did not complete high school. Comparatively, roughly 30 percent of marriages among those with a college degree end in divorce.

It used to be that marriages in which the woman was better educated than the man were more likely to end in divorce. This could have been due to social stigmas associated with women outperforming their husbands, but according to a 2014 study this is changing. The report, published in the American Sociological Review, “suggests that not only are men marrying women with higher education levels than them in greater numbers,” but also that these marriages have a comparable divorce rate to marriages in which both partners have the same education or in which the men have more higher education.

Divorce among marriages in which women were more educated than men hit a peak in the 1950s and 1970s. This association began to decline in the 1980s as society and women’s roles in the workforce continued to change, but this decade is the first in which the association was entirely comparable to the general divorce rate. One of the study's authors says that more research needs to be done into the correlation between women out-earning their husbands. While American women are statistically earning more degrees than men, “they are still making less money from those degrees.” Because of this, it is difficult to study the effect of earning as a result of higher education on marriages.

...

 relationship with parents IMAGEIf you had a bad relationship with your parents as a teenager, chances are you could be headed for (or already in) a bad romantic relationship. According to a University of Alberta study headed by associate professor Matt Johnson, there is “a direct link between participants’ relationship with their parents and the quality of their current love lives,” reports the Huffington Post. The study found that participants who had positive parent-teen relationships were more likely to have “higher quality intimate relationships as adults. Teenagers who experienced rocky relationships with their parents had more romantic problems later in life,” according to the Huffington Post.

This is not to say that parents are solely responsible for their children’s bad romantic lives, of course. Yet Johnson told the Huffington Post that “people tend to compartmentalize their relationships,” meaning that they usually fail to see how one affects the other. “Understanding your contribution to the relationship with your parents would be important to recognizing any tendency to replicate behavior—positive or negative—in an intimate relationship,” Johnson told the Huffington Post.

It is not just a personal relationship with one’s parents that affects the likelihood of a bad relationship, either. A Cambridge University Press study reported upon by The Daily Beast states that “if your parents were divorced you’re at least 40 percent more likely to get divorced than if they weren’t. If your parents married others after divorcing, you are 91 percent more likely to get divorced.” Divorce Magazine publisher Dan Couvrette told The Daily Beast that this could be because “witnessing our parents’ divorces reinforces our ambivalence about commitment in a ‘disposable society.’”

...
The Law Office of Matthew M. Williams, P.C.

630-409-8184

1444 North Farnsworth Avenue, Suite 307, Aurora, IL 60505

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn
Back to Top