The Law Office of Matthew M. Williams, P.C.

630-409-8184

1444 North Farnsworth Avenue, Suite 307, Aurora, IL 60505

Yorkville Office By Appointment

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DuPage County child support attorney

Both parents have an obligation to financially support their children, even if one parent is considered “custodial” while the other parent is “non-custodial.” Because of this, child support exists in the majority of cases that involve parents who are divorced, legally separated, or who were never married in the first place. Child support is intended to be used to help pay for the child’s necessities, such as food, clothing, and shelter. If a parent is subject to a child support order, he or she is legally obligated to make the stated monthly child support payments; otherwise, serious consequences could result. When a parent does not abide by child support orders, it can put a financial strain on the custodial parent, but fortunately, there are steps you can take for enforcement if your child’s other parent has failed to make child support payments.

Defining Failure of Support

If a parent is having a bad month financially, and child support payments are late or delayed, typically no action will need to be taken, as long as the paying parent is able to pay the amount due within a reasonable time period. However, if non-payment has become a pattern, and the parent has not made multiple payments, legal action may need to be taken. A parent is considered to have committed failure to support if he or she does any of the following:

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Parents have a responsibility to contribute to the financial support of their children.  Under Illinois law, divorce does not relieve a parent of parental rights and responsibilities, therefore financial support of children continues after a marriage dissolves.

As part of the divorce process, a family court will make determinations regarding child custody and whether one parent must provide the other with child support in Illinois.  Child support payments help to cover basic needs such as shelter, food, and clothing.  In some instances, child support agreements may include contributions to things such as education, medical expenses, child care, or extracurricular activities.  Once a court determines the amount of child support, it will issue a Uniform Order of Support, which sets out amounts, payment schedules, and penalties for missed payments among other things.  Talk to your attorney for help understanding child support in Illinois.

How much child support will I have to pay?

Child support amounts are generally determined based on the paying parent’s net income.  Net income means a person’s income after the deductions of the following:

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The Law Office of Matthew M. Williams, P.C.

630-409-8184

1444 North Farnsworth Avenue, Suite 307, Aurora, IL 60505

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