The Law Office of Matthew M. Williams, P.C.

630-409-8184

1444 North Farnsworth Avenue, Suite 307, Aurora, IL 60505

Batavia parenting plan attorney

Divorce is filled with issues to settle and decisions to make, which can pose a challenge for some couples, especially if they are not on the best of terms. All couples argue about things from time to time, but divorcing couples have often reached the point where disagreements become heated very quickly and can elevate to all-out wars. When it comes to decisions involving the children, these arguments can become even more hostile, and resolving them can be a very emotional process. If your divorce reaches the point where you have to go to court to come to a resolution on matters related to the allocation of parental responsibilities and parenting time, you will need to convince the judge that you will be able to provide for your children's best interests. There are certain things that you should avoid doing when you are fighting for a favorable parenting plan:

Resist the Urge to Complain on Social Media

Social media is present in many peoples’ lives these days. In divorce cases, it can become a tool in your ex’s arsenal to use against you if you are posting the wrong type of things on your timeline. Even if you are just sharing a photo of yourself and your new partner, your ex could use it in a negative way, perhaps by claiming that you are more focused on your new relationship than on your children's best interests. Be extremely cautious of what you post online during your divorce proceedings, and above all, do not post anything directly pertaining to your case.

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Illinois divorce attorney, Illinois family lawyer, Illinois child custody lawyer,If you are a divorced parent, you probably know how difficult celebrations and get-togethers can be, especially when they involve family or your children. Halloween is a very child-oriented holiday and can be stressful for some parents if they do not know how to handle it. With trick-or-treating, Halloween parties and choosing a costume, there are many things that you must discuss with your ex-spouse, whether you like it or not. Like many things in life, communication is key when having a happy Halloween. Here are four tips to help your child have a good spooky season. Communicate, Plan and Prepare It has already been said, but it needs to be said again - communication is key. You should probably have had these discussions a few weeks ago, but if you have not, you need to have them as soon as possible. Talk with your ex and figure out a game plan as far as school Halloween events, such as parties or parades. You should also discuss how you both will spend Halloween with your child and who will be doing what. Share the Night With Your Ex If you and your ex can manage it, you should share the night with your child. That can mean that you both take your child trick-or-treating at the same time, or that can mean that one of you takes your child trick-or-treating first and then the other one takes your child trick-or-treating after. Double the trick-or-treating means double the candy - and your child probably will not complain. Talk About Your Child’s Costume Costumes have become less scary over the years and more provacative. You and your ex should discuss your child’s costume before either of you agree to allow your child to wear it, especially if you have teenage children. It is only respectful that you allow your ex to partake in the decision of what costume your child wears. Focus on Your Child Above all, you should recognize that Halloween is a time for both you and your spouse to have fun with your child. You should put aside any hard feelings or differences that you and your ex may have and focus on your child. Your child will thank you for it someday. Create a Solid Parenting Plan with Help From an Aurora, IL Divorce Attorney

Halloween is just the beginning of a multi-month stretch of planning and communicating about various holidays and their respective events, parties and festivities. A comprehensive parenting plan created by a DuPage County divorce lawyer can help take some of the guesswork out of where your child will be during each of those holidays and how you will get to spend it with them. Contact the Law Office of Matthew M. Williams, P.C. to begin discussing your specific needs in a parenting plan. Call the office at 630-409-8184 to set up a consultation.

 

Sources:

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/halloween-trick-or-treat_b_6028064

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parental responsibilities, Illinois family law attorneysWhen you are in the midst of a divorce, it may seem very tempting to just sit back and the let a judge make the difficult decisions. Of course, this approach fails to account for the multiple court appearances that will probably be necessary, and the fact that you will still need to provide the court with all of the information and evidence relevant to your case. Divorce laws in Illinois explicitly promote amicable agreements between divorcing spouses whenever possible. Divorcing parents, in particular, are expected to work together in developing a plan for cooperative parenting and protecting their children’s best interests. Parents Know Best There are many examples in Illinois family law indicating that a court must presume that parents will act in the best interest of their child. This is based on the idea that, unless proven otherwise, parents are equipped to fully understand the situation at hand and to make decisions for their child that are ultimately beneficial. Due to recent updates to the Illinois Marriage and Dissolution of Marriage Act, the same concept is now being applied to co-parenting and the allocation of parental responsibilities. Rather than assuming that courts should make parenting judgments, the amended law requires divorcing parents to develop a strategy for parenting together. The plan, of course, must be reviewed and approved by the court, but the court will only make changes or enter a judgment of its own when absolutely necessary to protect the child’s interests. Parenting Plans According to the law, once a proceeding for the allocation of parental responsibilities—formerly child custody—has begun, parents have 120 days to file a proposed parenting plan. The plan must address each party’s rights, decision-making authority, parenting time schedule, and a number of other concerns required by law. The deadline may be extended if either parent can show good cause. If the parents cannot agree on a plan, the court has the authority to order mediation to assist in the process. Should mediation ultimately fail, or if either party refuses to participate in good faith, the court may allocate parental responsibilities, likely taking the refusal to cooperate into account. A parenting plan that addresses all of the appropriate concerns and that is reasonable to both parents will be approved by the court and entered as part of the divorce judgment. Parents can later amend the plan either by agreement or by showing of a substantial change in circumstances. Legal Advocate for Parents

If you have questions about divorce, parenting plans, or the allocation of parental responsibilities, contact an experienced Aurora family law attorney. We will help you find the answers you need so that you can make an informed, responsible decision about how to proceed with your case. Call 630-409-8184 to schedule an appointment at the Law Office of Matthew M. Williams, P.C., today.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?DocName=075000050HPt%2E+VI&ActID=2086&ChapterID=0&SeqStart=8350000&SeqEnd=10200000

decision-making, DuPage County family law attorneyIf you are in the process of getting divorced or ending a relationship with your child’s other parent, you undoubtedly realize that the road ahead is likely to be a tough one. Even in the most amicable of situations, making arrangement regarding your roles as co-parents can be extremely challenging. There are many considerations that go into developing a workable parenting plan, of course, but certain elements are generally recognized as being among the most important. The authority over such aspects of the child’s life are known under the law as significant decision-making responsibilities, and they represent a major portion of any co-parenting agreement.

Formerly Legal Custody

For many years, the state of Illinois addressed parenting roles in terms of physical and legal custody. Physical custody referred to a parent’s access to the child. In most cases, a parent would be granted at least shared physical custody of the child, meaning the child would be able to spend in the home of both parents on some type of rotating basis. Legal custody, by comparison, referred to the authority of the parents to make important decisions regarding the child’s upbringing. This was allocated in one of a couple ways: legal custody could be granted to one parent in a sole custody arrangement, or shared between both parents in a joint custody agreement.

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The Law Office of Matthew M. Williams, P.C.

630-409-8184

1444 North Farnsworth Avenue, Suite 307, Aurora, IL 60505

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