The Law Office of Matthew M. Williams, P.C.

630-409-8184

1444 North Farnsworth Avenue, Suite 307, Aurora, IL 60505

Aurora family law attorney, mental health, psychological disorders, mental illness, substance abuse, divorce and mental illnessProblems with mental health and psychological disorders can place an extremely large stressor on any relationship, and can certainly contribute to many divorces across Illinois and the United States. The various symptoms of these vastly different medical conditions often go unaddressed, causing subversive conflict. And according to the  National Institute of Mental Health, an estimated 57.7 million American adults suffer from psychological disorders.

Considering the regular conflicts that arise in marriages every day, if one or both partners suffer from a psychological disorder, these problems can easily become amplified – and often accumulate over time. By definition marriage is a partnership. If one party has a problem it generally transfers to the other – whether intentional or not.

It is not uncommon for adults with no history of mental illness to develop a condition they are ill-prepared to deal with themselves. This can be a very serious problem amongst couples, especially when other common factors are thrown into the mix –  such as children and even substance abuse. Often, the sufferer begins to lose the ability to take care of him or herself, and as a result their partner must continue to get more and more vigilante.

...

Aurora family law attorney, divorce rates, divorce trends, social media, social media and divorce, social network sites, human behavior, social media behaviorIs the overuse of social media, such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, a predictor of marital dissatisfaction and divorce? A new Boston University study by James Katz, Feld Family Professor of Emerging Media Studies, found a correlation between using social network sites, spousal issues, and the divorce rate. In fact, the argument behind the study shows a strong connection between online behavior, human behavior, and divorce. And as social media use becomes more widespread across the country, it is likely that researchers will continue to explore the connection between relationships and social media.

To begin, the study reviewed married couples across 43 states between 2008-2010, and it looked at Facebook’s effect by dividing the number of account users in each state by the total population. It was found that a 20 percent increase in Facebook users generated a two percent increase in divorce rate.

The researchers also examined a study from the University of Texas at Austin. The 2011 research had polled 1,200 married individuals between the ages of 18 and 39 regarding the romantic quality of their marriage. Non-users of social media reported themselves as 11 percent happier than heavy users, and only half as likely to consider leaving their spouse.

...

divorce rate, divorce trends, Illinois divorce lawyer, Illinois divorce attorney, baby boomers, cohabitationThe bulk of research dedicated to determining the prevalence of divorce in this country has discussed a downward trend since the 1980’s. New research indicates, however, that broad generalizations like that don’t get into the heart of more specific aspects of divorce.

Researchers from the University of Minnesota recently took advantage of refined U.S. Census data about divorce to determine just how reliable claims about a declining divorce rate are. According to the study authors, the divorce rate has actually remained relatively steadily since 1980. The determining factor for the divorce rate turned out to be age. When controlling for age, researchers found out that the divorce rate has actually increased by as much as 40 percent since that time.

Divorce rates across age groups are not the same, according to the findings in this study. Back in 1970, there was very little difference between divorce rates for younger and older individuals, but that quickly chances. Baby boomers account for most of the increases in divorce rates. In fact, study authors believe that baby boomers are primarily responsible for “marital instability” that occurred after 1970. This same subset of individuals had higher divorce rates in their 20s and 30s, too, but they still make up a significant portion of divorcing couples.

...

imsis574-027More couples are choosing to live together before getting married, but that does not necessarily mean that they face a higher chance of divorce. New research out of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro found that there’s no correlation between cohabitation and divorce except when two individuals cohabitate at a young age.

This is not surprising, because settling down at a young age has already been linked to divorce in past studies. The research considered data from thousands of women from 1995, 2002, and between 2006 and 2010, and the results were published in the Journal of Marriage and Family. Lead researcher April Kuperberg says that this is an indication that all past research connecting cohabitation and divorce was the result of incorrect measurements.

Moving in with your significant other can be a difficult adjustment period, but it can also help clue you in to whether or not the relationship should move forward. Different habits in the household can cause couples to erupt into fights. Combining finances for the ease of paying bills can also clue significant others into the spending habits of their partners. Money, in fact, can be a significant factor that influences disagreements between partners.

...

second marriage, multiple marriages, lawyer, attorney, divorce, third marriageAlthough a lot of people who have been married once have learned many lessons from that process, this doesn’t mean that most remarriages attempts are successful. In fact, according to research, nearly 70 percent of second marriages and nearly 75 percent of third marriages end in divorce.

There are many different issues that can impact a second or third marriage. To start with, anyone who has gone through a divorce might have some trepidation about the process, but likely less fear than before. Some familiarity with the process reduces anxiety about getting divorced a second or third time.

Others might enter a new marriage on the rebound or by locating someone with similar habits as their former spouse. Over time, these habits and behaviors can grow increasingly irritating, leading an individual to think about divorce. When feeling lonely is something you experience after a first divorce, be more aware of these tendencies so that you can reduce the chances of getting divorced again.

...
The Law Office of Matthew M. Williams, P.C.

630-409-8184

1444 North Farnsworth Avenue, Suite 307, Aurora, IL 60505

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn
Back to Top